Tuesday, 13 October 2015

Mini Reviews: Books I wish I'd DNFed

These are the books I've read over the last few weeks which I wish I'd given up on. In some cases it was definitely as case of it's not you it's me with the state I've been in. In other cases, based on reviews from my blogger friends, it definitely isn't just me.

Silence is Goldfish by Annabel Pitcher



My name is Tess Turner - at least, that's what I've always been told. I have a voice but it isn't mine. It used to say things so I'd fit in, to please my parents, to please my teachers. It used to tell the universe I was something I wasn't. It lied. It never occurred to me that everyone else was lying too. But the words that really hurt weren't the lies: it was six hundred and seventeen words of truth that turned my world upside down. Words scare me, the lies and the truth, so I decided to stop using them. I am Pluto. Silent. Inaccessible. Billions of miles away from everything I thought I knew. Tessie-T has never really felt she fitted in and after what she read that night on her father's blog she knows for certain that she never will. How she deals with her discovery makes an entirely riveting, heart-breaking story told through Tess's eyes as she tries to find her place in the world.

Urrggh this book. I've loved Annabel's previous books and I was so so so excited for this and I was so disappointed with it to the point where I kind of wish I hadn't bothered. I found the main character so so so so irritating that I actually hated her a little bit. It also featured one of my pet peeves in YA which didn't help.

Fans of the Impossible Life by Kate Scelsa


 Ten months after her recurring depression landed her in the hospital, Mira is starting over at Saint Francis Prep. She promised her parents she would at least try to pretend that she could act like a functioning human this time, not a girl who can’t get out of bed for days on end, who only feels awake when she’s with Sebby. Jeremy is the painfully shy art nerd at Saint Francis who’s been in self-imposed isolation after an incident that ruined his last year of school. When he sees Sebby for the first time across the school lawn, it’s as if he’s been expecting him. Sebby, Mira’s gay best friend, is a boy who seems to carry sunlight around with him like a backlit halo. Even as life in his foster home starts to take its toll, Sebby and Mira together craft a world of magic rituals and impromptu road trips, designed to fix the broken parts of their lives. As Jeremy finds himself drawn into Sebby and Mira’s world, he begins to understand the secrets that they hide in order to protect themselves, to keep each other safe from those who don’t understand their quest to live for the impossible.

The blurb for this sounded so good. Unfortunately it wasn't. I didn't like the characters and it wasn't at all like the blurb and therefore no what I was hoping for at all.

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead



Bridge is an accident survivor who's wondering why she's still alive. Emily has new curves and an almost-boyfriend who wants a certain kind of picture. Tabitha sees through everybody's games--or so she tells the world. The three girls are best friends with one rule: No fighting. Can it get them through seventh grade?  This year everything is different for Sherm Russo as he gets to know Bridge Barsamian. What does it mean to fall for a girl--as a friend?  On Valentine's Day, an unnamed high school girl struggles with a betrayal. How long can she hide in plain sight?

 I hated the way this story was told. Part of it was in second person which was just weird. I didn't connect with any of the characters. I just wish I hadn't. Definitely a me thing though because I passed it onto Keris who loved it.

Dangerous Lies by Becca Fitzpatrick


A teen is forced to make a fresh start after witnessing a violent crime—but love and danger find her anyway. Stella Gordon is not her real name. Thunder Basin, Nebraska, is not her real home. This is not her real life. After witnessing a lethal crime, Stella Gordon is sent to the middle of nowhere for her own safety before she testifies against the man she saw kill her mother’s drug dealer. But Stella was about to start her senior year with the boyfriend she loves. How can she be pulled away from the only life she knows and expected to start a new one in Nebraska? Stella chafes at her protection and is rude to everyone she meets. She’s not planning on staying long, so why be friendly? Then she meets Chet Falconer and it becomes harder to keep her guard up, even as her guilt about having to lie to him grows. As Stella starts to feel safer, the real threat to her life increases—because her enemies are actually closer than she thinks…

I don't know why I picked this up.  I really don't after I read Black Ice. The main character was an irritating and ungrateful bitch who I hated for most of the book. I get that she had issues but she was such a self entitled brat that I wanted to scream. I literally only kept reading for the hot cowboy.

Tonight the Streets are Ours by Leila Sales







Recklessly loyal. That’s how seventeen-year-old Arden Huntley has always thought of herself. Caring for her loved ones is what gives Arden purpose in her life and makes her feel like she matters. But lately she’s grown resentful of everyone—including her needy best friend and her absent mom—taking her loyalty for granted. Then Arden stumbles upon a website called Tonight the Streets Are Ours, the musings of a young New York City writer named Peter, who gives voice to feelings that Arden has never known how to express. He seems to get her in a way that no one else does, and he hasn’t even met her. Until Arden sets out on a road trip to find him. During one crazy night out in New York City filled with parties, dancing, and music—the type of night when anything can happen, and nearly everything does—Arden discovers that Peter isn’t exactly who she thought he was. And maybe she isn’t exactly who she thought she was, either.

I wanted to love this book. I love Leila Sales but I think this fell victim to me being in a rubbish mood at the moment. I didn't like Arden all that much and I really didn't care what happened to her in the end.

1 comment:

Anya said...

Totally agree with Fans of the Impossible Life - it was so bizarre! Had its moments but I did struggle to finish parts of it