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Stranger by Keren David

Astor, Ontario. 1904.
A boy staggers out of the forest covered in blood and collapses at the feet of 16-year-old Emmy. While others are suspicious and afraid, Emmy is drawn to him. Is he really the monster the townsfolk say he is?

Astor, Ontario. 1994.
Megan arrives from London for her great grandmother Emmy’s 105th birthday. It should be a happy family occasion, but Megan is nursing a broken heart and carrying a secret she fears might consume her.

I thoroughly enjoyed Stranger. I really enjoy novels where the narrative is split between a linked contemporary and historical story where at first the link isn't fully clear and over the course of the novel the linked are unveiled so I was incredibly excited to read this book.

The contemporary story is really lovely. It follows Megan who has arrived in Canada to celebrate a special family occasion and spend time with her father who she lives hundreds of miles away from. While it is supposed to be a happy time for her she has a broke…

Truly Wildly Deeply by Jenny McLachlan

Annie is starting college. She can’t wait. No more school, no more uniform, and no one telling her what to do. It’s the start of a new adventure and Annie’s not going to let anyone or anything get in the way of that. Freedom matters to Annie. She has cerebral palsy and she’s had to fight hard to get the world to see her for who she truly is.

Then she meets Fab. He’s six foot two, Polish and a passionate believer in…well, just about everything, but most of all Annie and good old fashioned romance. The moment Fab sees Annie, he’s wildly drawn to her and declares she must be his girl. Annie’s horrified. She doesn’t want to be anyone’s anything, especially if it means losing her independence.

But then Annie finds herself falling for Fab. As things go deeply wrong, Annie realises that love can make you do wild, crazy things, and so she sets out to win his heart with a romantic gesture of truly epic proportions!

Fans fell in love with the warmth, wit, romance and fierce friends…

Clean by Juno Dawson

A razor-sharp, adrenaline rush of a novel from award-winning author Juno Dawson, Clean is Gossip Girl meets Girl, Interrupted.

'I can feel it swimming through my veins like glitter ... it's liquid gold.'

When socialite Lexi Volkov almost overdoses, she thinks she's hit rock bottom.

She's wrong. Rock bottom is when she's forced into an exclusive rehab facility.

From there, the only way is up for Lexi and her fellow inmates, including the mysterious Brady.

As she faces her demons, Lexi realises love is the most powerful drug of all ...

It's a dirty business getting clean ...

Addiction and redemption, love and despair. Clean will have you hooked from the first page.


Clean is a brilliant YA read and a perfect example of how YA fiction can be used to tackle more mature ideas in a thoughtful way to make a real impact on its reader.

Clean does not hold back. It tackles a broad range of issues including drug addiction, gender identity, eating disorders, mental health …

The infinite lives of Maisie Day by Christopher Edge

How do you know you really exist?

It's Maisie's birthday and she can't wait to open her presents. She's hoping for the things she needs to build her own nuclear reactor. But she wakes to an empty house and outside the front door is nothing but a terrifying, all-consuming blackness. Trapped in an ever-shifting reality, Maisie knows that she will have to use the laws of the universe and the love of her family to survive. And even that might not be enough...

A mind-bending mystery for anyone who's ever asked questions. From the author of The Many Worlds of Albie Bright and The Jamie Drake Equation.

The infinite lives of Maisie Day was a really lovely read which I enjoyed.

What I liked about it was that it had a young female lead and was completely focused around science and coding. There's not enough fiction focused on science that is female led and I loved it for that. The story is exciting from the outset with lots of twists and turns including time ju…

Can't wait to read

A another month, another pile of books I can't wait to get my hands on ....






The Breakfast Club meets One Day in Floored, a unique collaborative novel by seven bestselling and award-winning YA authors: Sara Barnard, Holly Bourne, Tanya Byrne, Non Pratt, Melinda Salisbury, Lisa Williamson and Eleanor Wood.

When they got in the lift, they were strangers (though didn't that guy used to be on TV?): Sasha, who is desperately trying to deliver a parcel; Hugo, who knows he's the best-looking guy in the lift and is eyeing up Velvet, who knows what that look means when you hear her name and it doesn't match the way she looks, or the way she talks; Dawson, who was on TV, but isn't as good-looking as he was a few years ago and is desperately hoping no one recognizes him; Kaitlyn, who's losing her sight but won't admit it, and who used to have a poster of Dawson on her bedroom wall, and Joe, who shouldn't be here at all, but who wants to be here the most…

Library Loans March

I've not borrowed a huge amount from the library this month, most because I've had a lot of review books turn up. That said the books I did borrow were all brilliant





Star by Star by Sheena Wilkinson

Stella has always looked forward to changing the world. It’s what she was brought up to do, by a suffragette mother who knew all about fighting and rebellion. But it’s November 1918. The great flu pandemic sweeping the world has robbed Stella of her mother and her home, and she’s alone in a strange country, with an aunt she’s never met.

But change is coming – the war is over, and women are about to vote for the first time. History is being made, but how can she help make it? As election day approaches, a day that will transform Ireland forever, Stella realises that she can indeed change the world. Not alone, and not all at once. But just as stars come one by one to brighten the night sky, so history is made person by person, girl by girl.


I loved this book. It is set toward…

The Mollie Suffragette Books

I have been a bit obsessed with Suffragette books of late and was very excited indeed to have two books drop through my door recently which were both YA books and focused on Suffragettes.

It’s 1912, and Mollie Carberry’s life in the relatively new middle class north Dublin suburb of Drumcondra seems very boring. Then she notices that her older sister Phyllis and the family’s maid Maggie are plotting something. They discover a stash of leaflets demanding votes for women. Phyllis has joined the suffragette cause! Will Mollie get involved too? And how far should a girl go for her beliefs?


Mollie Carberry is a suffragette! Well, sort of. Mollie and her best friend Nora have been bravely fighting for women’s rights – even though no one else really knows about it. But when they hear a big protest is being planned, they know they have to take part. If only they didn’t have to worry about Nora’s terrible cousin, her awful brother and her neighbour’s very annoying dog … An engaging s…

Tender by Eve Ainsworth

Marty and Daisy spend their lives pretending. Marty pretends his mum's grip on reality isn't slipping by the day. Daisy pretends her parents aren't exhausting themselves while they look after her incurably ill brother. They both pretend they're fine. But the thing about pretending is, at some point, it has to stop. And then what?

Eve Ainsworth writes really heartfelt and beautiful books which are incredibly thoughtful. I thoroughly enjoyed her previous books so had really high hopes for this and I'm please to announced that this was as good as I hoped.

Tender is the story of Marty and Daisy both of whom are struggling acting. Marty's mum clearly has mental health issues which aren't being addresses and Daisy's parents are totally focused on her younger brother who is terminally ill. Both of them are trying to go on as normal but doing that is hard.

For me this book really made me feel for both of the characters particularly because I suspect I know…

Running on empty by SE Durrant

AJ’s grandfather has always been the one to keep his unusual family together, so when he dies things start to unravel at the edges.

AJ is worried about his parents but they don’t really seem to notice. In order to deal with his grief and to keep his anxiety at bay, AJ does what he and his grandfather did best: running. Round and round the Olympic Park, aiming for the nationals, running to escape, AJ only seems to be heading ever closer to disaster. Running On Empty is a beautiful book about false starts and emotional journeys, with hope as the ultimate finishing line.

I thoroughly enjoyed this thoughtful little book.

Running on Empty is the story of AJ. AJ lives in East London, close to the Olympic park and is a runner. AJ's grandfather dies early on in the book and the story the follows shows how AJ deals with life without his rock.

AJ has such a tough time because his parents both have learning difficulties. They are kind and loving people who work but they heavily relied on…

Can't wait to read: The UKYA edition

I've read a ridiculous amount this month. As of the time of writing I'm onto book 50 of the year (not including the dozen or so I've DNFed). My TBR pile is seriously depleted and the library aren't getting new stock in quick enough. I desperately need some new books and these are some of those I have my eye on.


It's a wrap by Perdita and Honor Cargill



Elektra James is back and her life is more hilariously chaotic than ever!

Elektra is hoping for big things this year... She's finished her first feature film (even if her character was unexpectedly killed off half-way through filming), hosted the party of the year (well, before her mum arrived and threw everyone out - how embarrassing!) and managed to become Archie Mortimer's Actual Real Life girlfriend (for now anyway...), so things are most definitely moving in the right direction. But with social media to navigate (#actinggoals #instanightmare), GCSEs looming and a seemingly never-ending parade of fai…

Library Loans February

I've not read much from the library this month. Not particularly because of a conscious decision. A lot of the books I've reserved haven't come in yet which means I haven't been in for a browse and my review reading pile needed a bit of attention. That said the books I have from the library were awesome as follows.

The Dark Angel by Elly Griffiths


Not a review as such for this one as if you haven't read the rest of the series it won't mean much to you. I power read through the other none books over the summer and was delighted to get my hands on this earlier in the month. I'm not quite sure now I'm going to last waiting a year for the next one.

Rise up women by Diane Atkinson


This had to be one of the most readable non fiction books I've picked up in a while and I loved it, so much so I've added it to my wishlist to buy a cop for school a some point. It looks at the fight for the vote with a lot of focus on the suffragist movement and absolutely…

Make More Noise

Each story, written by a star-studded list of contributors, including well-known, award-winning and new voices in children’s literature, celebrates strong female characters, with subjects ranging from the ’43 Group to modern ghost stories.

A donation of £1 from the sale of each copy will be given to Camfed, an international charity which tackles poverty and inequality by supporting women’s education in the developing world. The book will be published in time for the centenary anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918, which was given Royal Assent on 6th February 1918, extending the franchise to women for the first time.

Author Kiran Millwood Hargrave, comments: “I’m honoured to be contributing to an anthology that celebrates girls in all their complexity and world-changing power: we need to hear and tell their stories.”


Make More Noise is a brilliant collection of short stories of girls standing up for themselves and generally being awesome. The list of contri…

Far from the tree by Robin Benway

A contemporary novel about three adopted siblings who find each other at just the right moment.

Being the middle child has its ups and downs.

But for Grace, an only child who was adopted at birth, discovering that she is a middle child is a different ride altogether. After putting her own baby up for adoption, she goes looking for her biological family, including—

Maya, her loudmouthed younger bio sister, who has a lot to say about their newfound family ties. Having grown up the snarky brunette in a house full of chipper redheads, she’s quick to search for traces of herself among these not-quite-strangers. And when her adopted family’s long-buried problems begin to explode to the surface, Maya can’t help but wonder where exactly it is that she belongs.

And Joaquin, their stoic older bio brother, who has no interest in bonding over their shared biological mother. After seventeen years in the foster care system, he’s learned that there are no heroes, and secrets and fears are b…

The Wicked Cometh by Laura Carlin

The year is 1831

Down the murky alleyways of London, acts of unspeakable wickedness are taking place and no one is willing to speak out on behalf of the city's vulnerable poor as they disappear from the streets.

Out of these shadows comes Hester White, a bright young woman who is desperate to escape the slums by any means possible.

When Hester is thrust into the world of the aristocratic Brock family, she leaps at the chance to improve her station in life under the tutelage of the fiercely intelligent and mysterious Rebekah Brock. But whispers from her past slowly begin to poison her new life and both she and Rebekah are lured into the most sinister of investigations.

Hester and Rebekah find themselves crossing every boundary they've ever known in pursuit of truth, redemption and passion. But their trust in each other will be tested as a web of deceit begins to unspool, dragging them into the blackest heart of a city where something more depraved than either of them c…

Unveiling Venus Blog Tour: Guest post from Sophia Bennett - Exhibition diary