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Blog Tour: Guest post from Anne Booth author of Across the divide.

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White Rabbit, Red Wolf by Tom Pollock

Described as The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time meets John le Carre, about a teen math prodigy with an extreme anxiety disorder who finds himself caught in a web of lies and conspiracies after an assassination attempt on his mother.

I cannot write a long review for this book. Not because it isn't good, it really is, but because it'd be so easy for me to spoil something if I did.

White Rabbit, Red Wolf follows the story of a teen with issues. He has an extreme anxiety disorder, but the story is not about those issues and rather focuses on shocking events that unfold while he attends an event where his mother is due to give a speech about her work. The story is intense and told at break neck pace which means it is one of those books you don't want to put down. 

The John Le Carre comparisons are totally fair if Le Carre was fortunate enough to be able to write YA fiction this good. I loved it and will be recommending it far and wide.

can't wait to read

Another month, another pile of books I'm desperate to get my hands on

Don't stop thinking about tomorrow by Siobhan Curham


Fourteen-year-old Stevie lives in Lewes with her beloved vinyl collection, her mum ... and her mum's depression. When Stevie's mum's disability benefits are cut, Stevie and her mother are plunged into a life of poverty. But irrepressible Stevie is determined not to be beaten and she takes inspiration from the lyrics of her father's 1980s record collection and dreams of a life as a musician. Then she meets Hafiz, a talented footballer and a Syrian refugee. Hafiz's parents gave their life savings to buy Hafiz a safe passage to Europe; his journey has been anything but easy. Then he meets Stevie... As Stevie and Hafiz's friendship grows, they encourage each other to believe in themselves and follow their dreams.

I love Siobhan's books and this looks ace.

 Peril in Paris by Katherine Woodfine


ALL ABOARD THE TRAIN TO PARIS! …

Library Loans May 2018

I started this thinking I didn't have much to share with you this month but actually know I've looked back I read loads of awesome things from the library this month.

Suffragette The battle for equality by David Roberts



2018 marks a century since the first women won the vote in the United Kingdom, and Suffragette tells the story of their fight. This is a tale of astounding bravery, ingenuity, and strength. David's conversational style is accessible and his artwork full of rich detail, bringing to life the many vivid characters of the Suffragette movement - from the militant activist Rosa May Billinghurst to the world-famous Emmeline Pankhurst. Covering the whole range of suffragette experiences - from aristocrats to the middle and working classes, as well as a look at the global struggle for universal suffrage, Suffragette is a fantastic introduction to a fascinating topic

This book is so beautiful. Followers of my blog will know I can't get enough suffragette stuf…

World War One Picture books by Hilary Robinson and Martin Impey

Last month I was approached by a publishing house asking if I'd be up for reviewing some World War One books aimed at children. I'm always interested in taking books with a history theme to read even if they are a bit younger than my tastes because they are perfect for school and give me a wider range of books to recommend to the kids that come through my door of various abilities.

I was not ready for the treat that was in store.



All four of the books feature beautiful illustrations and verse which used both together very simply but vividly put across the realities of war for those who were involved. The latest book to be released is Peace Lily focusing on the role of women at war which I particularly enjoyed. Other books in the series are The Christmas Truce (obviously focusing on the Christmas Truce), Flo of the Somme (looking at the role of animals in World War One) and where the poppies now grow (focusing on the experience for an ordinary soldier).





I thoroughly enjoyed all…

In your light Blog Tour: Guest post from author AJ Grainger

Ella on the outside by Cath Howe

Ella is the new girl at school. She doesn't know anyone and she doesn't have any friends. And she has a terrible secret.

Ella can't believe her luck when Lydia, the most popular girl in school, decides to be her new best friend - but what does Lydia really want? And what does it all have to do with Molly, the quiet, shy girl who won't talk to anyone?

A gripping story of lies, friendship, and blackmail...

Ella on the outside is a beautiful MG title which really makes the reader think about the importance of friendship, picking good friends and being a good friend to those around you. Ella is a bit lost at the start of the book. Her mother has relocated the family, her father is in prison and she's started a new school without her best friend beside her and finding it tough to break into existing friendhsip groups.

What I particularly loved about this book was through Ella you get to explore what it means to be a good friend. Ella initially is drawn to Lydia, the p…