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Library Loans: July 2017

This month I've not managed to read a huge amount from the library but those I did get to were excellent.

The Secrets of the Superglue Sisters by Susie Day

Best friends Georgie and Jem aren't just new at school; they're new at being full-time sisters too. Georgie's mum and Jem's dad have finally bought a house together, and they get to share a home at last, just like they always wanted. School is a bit more challenging. Miss Eagle wants the whole class to start a self-esteem project. They'll write their biggest secret on a piece of paper shaped like a cloud and then float them up into the sky on a balloon and their worries will disappear. Then disaster! The ball of secrets disappears instead! Soon everyone's deepest secrets are being revealed to the whole school.

This was really cute and lovely as expected. Full of a lovely range of diverse characters. The story itself was really lovely and thoughtful. I love Susie's books are all companions to each other so can be read in any order but always feature cameos from characters from the other titles.  

Blade and Bone by Catherine Johnson

Young surgeon Ezra McAdam must hasten to Paris to rescue his friend Loveday Finch and her charge Mahmoud, the Ottoman prince, who have been caught up in the Revolution. On the way, Ezra experiences the war first hand on the battlefields of Northern France, where his surgical skills are in high demand by the beleaguered French army. Meanwhile, in Paris, the guillotine is busy, and the medical world is finding the surfeit of bodies useful to its research into the seat of life. Ezra is not persuaded by the controversial theories of his French colleagues, but his mind is on other matters. Finding Loveday and Mahmoud is proving harder than he had imagined: it would appear that Paris really is the most dangerous place on earth. Ezra’s search takes him from the grand Hotel Dieu to the dark catacombs below the city; from the opulent War Office to the tall, forbidding Conciergerie – the city prison – here he must undertake the most audacious rescue attempt of all.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book after loving the previous book in the series earlier in the year. The story continues to follow Ezra as he travels to France during the revolution. As with the previous book I was fascinated by the medical history side of the story and would be very keen to read a sequel if one were to appear.

When Dimple met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Dimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she’s more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma’s inexplicable obsession with her finding the “Ideal Indian Husband.” Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn’t have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers…right? Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him—wherein he’ll have to woo her—he’s totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself. The Shahs and Patels didn’t mean to start turning the wheels on this “suggested arrangement” so early in their children’s lives, but when they noticed them both gravitate toward the same summer program, they figured, Why not? Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works hard to prove itself in the most unexpected ways.

I heard about this ages ago when Melissa Cox bought it for publication in the UK. I've always enjoyed books she's recommended over the years I've followed her on twitter so I was very excited to read this.  It's really cute as a love story. It's diverse focusing on American Indian protagonists. I also love how focused Dimple is on her career and her drive for coding. It was a thoroughly enjoyable read.