Tuesday, 6 December 2016

picture books for christmas

This year I've actively been seeking out picture books and over the last month I've read through a lovely selection which would be awesome for Christmas presents for little people.

Snowflake in my pocket by Rachel Bright


From highly acclaimed picture book maker, Rachel Bright, comes a visually stunning, feel-good picture book filled with Yu Rong’s distinctive, awe-inspiring papercut artwork. The snow is coming – Bear can smell it! Squirrel is so excited – he’s never seen snow before! But when the snow arrives, Bear suddenly falls sick. Can Squirrel still bring some silvery, sparkly, magical whiteness to his best friend? Featuring a cut-out window in Squirrel's oak tree home, giving readers a sneak-peek to the wintry world outside, this delicately-crafted book captures the cosy, cuddly feeling of sharing a snowy night with a loved one, and is the perfect read for parents and children to treasure together – at Christmas and all year round.

I loved this book. It has a lovely message about friendships with people very different from yourself and I loved the wintery feel to it.

Blue Penguin by Petr Horacek


A heat-warming fable about a friendship and belonging from the award-winning illustrator Petr Horacek. "I feel just like a penguin," says Blue Penguin. "But you're not like us," said the other penguins and they left him all alone. Poor Blue Penguin. Will he be able to convince the other penguins he is one of them after all? A moving and beautifully illustrated story from Petr Horacek, an illustrator described by the Washington Post as "the thinking tot's Eric Carle".

Another really sweet book which celebrates difference with a really wintery setting.

Handstand by Lisa Stickley






Little Edith loves to do handstands. But is she any good at them? Can she actually stay upright? In her 7 days of perseverance she learns the power of practice. Thwarted by spiders, worms and her dad's newspaper, Edith tells her tale of mastering the art of being upside down. All the while, readers will be counting down the seconds with her and learning the days of week, in her story that ends with the prize of an ice lolly.

Beautifully illustrated by leading designer Lisa Stickley, this is a lovely book to cherish and learn from. A light hearted tale that will teach children one of life's great secrets: practice makes perfect.


I really enjoyed this book. This illustrations are quirky and I liked what it had to say about practice makes perfect. Also a fab book for those learning to count for the first time.


Construction by Sally Sutton





Hoist the wood. Hoist the wood. Chain and hook and strap. Swing it round, then lower it down. Thonk! Clonk! Clap! Build the frame. Build the frame. Hammer all day long. Make the stairs and floors and walls. Bing! Bang! Bong!

This was an unexpected favourite of mine from this pile. Small people who are fascinated by diggers and truck will love this. The pictures are bright and colourful. The sentences have a lovely rhythm to them and rhyme making it awesome to read out loud and choice of words makes you want to read them loud. Perfect for getting new readers wanting to join in. Also awesome that all the construction workers pictured aren't just male ones because girls like diggers too.

Once upon a northern night by Jean E Pendziwol


In this bedtime lullaby beautifully brought to life by the award-winning Isabelle Arsenault, illustrator of Jane, the Fox, and Me, a northern night unfolds as a young child sleeps. Wrapped in a snug, downy blanket, a snowflake falls, and then another and another. As the magic of the night outside takes hold – animals awaken, snow swirls, stars twinkle and winds whisper – a lyrical, enchanting read-aloud evokes a winter's night, while gently lulling a child to peaceful sleep.

This book is beautiful in its illustration but quite slow so probably better as a bedtime book.



Christmas eve tree by Delia Huddy


When the ugly little fir tree is taken to the city, no one wants to buy him; they prefer the big tall trees. But a homeless boy asks the shopkeeper if he can take the tree, and down by the river in a cardboard box, decorated with a few candles, the tree finds itself at the centre of a magical Christmas Eve it will never forget. A Christmas tale with a classic feel but a modern theme at its heart.

A really lovely read in a Christmas setting with lovely messages about hope and kindness. The illustrations are beautiful too. 

No comments: